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Isabella Bird spent much of her life as a world traveler. Her first published books, “The Englishwoman in America” (1856) and “Aspects of Religion in the United States” (1859), were both best-sellers and described her first experie...

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Born in Rotterdam, Holland, Antonia Brico was brought to America by abusive foster parents. After escaping their rule, this determined woman fulfilled her musical passions at the University of California. She was the first American accepted into the State...

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Called “a wispy, gentle, elegant, thoughtful dreadnought with wonderful manners and an indomitable will” by violinist Isaac Stern, Helen Marie Black was a civic and cultural leader and founder of the Denver Symphony Orchestra (DSO). In addition, she w...

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Laura Gilpin, a native Coloradan, attained international recognition as a landscape photographer, specializing in artistic techniques and honoring Southwest native cultures. The finest museums display her photographs. Gilpin’s work with the Navajo remai...

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Helen Bonfils and her sister May were two of Colorado’s most dedicated and generous philanthropists who supported many causes over the years. Their influence is most deeply felt in the arts. Helen became the more prominent of the two sisters. After the ...

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Charlotte “Kingo” Perry and Portia Mansfield left a positive imprint on the arts and culture in Colorado and the nation for over 70 years. They had unprecedented influence on vaudeville, Broadway, dance (particularly modern dance), education, ...

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Born and raised in Denver, Antoinette (Tony) Perry-Frueauff made her mark in the theater as a leading actress and director who opened doors for other women directors. Her place in theatrical history was guaranteed by her reputation as an activist and huma...

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Charlotte Perry and Portia Mansfield left a positive imprint on the arts and culture in Colorado and the nation for over 70 years. They had unprecedented influence on vaudeville, Broadway, dance (particularly modern dance), education, recreation, and docu...

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Denver native Cleo Parker Robinson is a renowned choreographer and the executive artistic director of the Cleo Parker Robinson Dance Ensemble. Overcoming nephritis, kidney failure, a heart attack, and ulcers during her childhood, she made dance her refuge...

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A lifelong Denver resident, Mary Coyle graduated from West High School at 15 and enrolled at the University of Colorado. As a 17-year-old reporter for the Rocky Mountain News, Mary covered everything from three-alarm fires to Denver Athletic Club prizefig...

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Helen Hunt Jackson led a hard life on the frontier plains; she lost her husband and two children during her lifetime. However, she was among the first authors to draw attention to the condition of the American Indian through her two books, “Ramona&#...

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Author, activist, educator, and women’s advocate could describe Mildred Pitts Walter, recipient of the 1987 Coretta Scott King Award for Literature. Her award-winning book “Justin and the Best Biscuits in the World” is just one of over a...

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