Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame
Press Releases 2019

CONTACT: Shannon Haltiwanger
404-668-8517 | Shannon.Haltiwanger@gmail.com
2020 Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame Inductees Named

DENVER (Nov. 04, 2019)  — A Secretary of the Interior and Colorado State Attorney General, a journalist and publisher, a frontier physician, a suffragist, journalists, educators, head of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, lawyers/civil rights activists, a community builder and restaurant owner comprise the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame Inductee Class of 2020.

These ten inductees will become the next group of extraordinary contemporary and historical Colorado women, who have made enduring and exemplary contributions to their fields, inspired and elevated the status of women and helped open new frontiers for women and society.

“Inspiration is the operative word,” says Deborah Radman, Chair of the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame. “These women are trailblazers, pioneers of opportunities for women, and all have left a positive mark on our state, nation and the world. They deserve to have their stories told and to be honored as shining examples of the potential of all women.”

The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame (CWHF) was founded in 1985. Every two years, the organization inducts contemporary and historical women who have significant ties to Colorado and have made a difference for women and girls through their courage and leadership. Since its founding, the CWHF has inducted 162 women from many races, backgrounds, socioeconomic levels, career paths, political philosophies, and religious beliefs for their outstanding contributions to society.

The lives of these extraordinary women are proof of what can be achieved with passion, commitment, grit and the grace to stand tall in the face of obstacles. They are trailblazers, visionaries, and women of courage, glass-ceiling breakers, innovators, and rule changers from all walks of life. Their
contributions span Colorado’s colorful and storied history, reaching all four corners of our state, and have spread to touch our nation and our world.

The Colorado Hall of Fame Induction is proudly sponsored this year by Colorado Public Radio, 5280 Magazine, Denver Channel 7, La Voz, and Urban Spectrum. To become a sponsor contact info@cogreatwomen.org

The 2020 Colorado Hall of Fame Inductees:

Contemporary

Katherine Archuleta

Katherine Archuleta

Growing up in Colorado’s San Luis Valley, Katherine Archuleta has had an extraordinary and influential career that has changed the landscape for what is possible for women and, specifically, Latina women. Her work has allowed her to guide policy at the state and national level on significant issues that impact all Americans. She is an exceptional role model for what it takes to be successful in the public and private sectors, with an unwavering commitment to justice and equality. Her core values have led her to provide women, especially women of color, with opportunities we might not have imagined for ourselves.

In 2013, President Barack Obama appointed Archuleta to be the first Latina to lead the U.S. Office of Personnel Management with a budget of approximately $250 million. In this role, she had the enormous job of managing human resources for the federal government’s 2 million employees.

Archuleta also served as Chief of Staff for two U.S. Cabinet members, Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis and Secretary of Transportation Federico Pena. In one of the most important and influential roles in government, she was responsible for providing direct policy, program, and managerial support and
served as the designated liaison between the Secretary, the White House, and other Federal departments and agencies. When Federico Pena became the Secretary of Energy, Katherine transitioned to his senior policy advisor.

Lupe Briseño

Lupe Briseño

As the organizer of the Kitayama Carnation Strike, Lupe Briseño demonstrated the strength and power of Latina leadership in Colorado’s Labor Movement and set the stage for the Colorado Chicano Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s and ‘70s. Her story is an essential chapter in the history of Colorado, the evolution of Latina feminist leadership, and the struggle for Chicano Civil Rights.

The Kitayama Carnation Strike was one of the seminal events in 1969 that laid the foundation for the Chicano Movement in Colorado. The impact of the women-led social movement reverberated throughout the state within the Chicano civil rights movement.

But most importantly, Lupe Briseño and the Kitayama Carnation Strike demanded that women, as well as all laborers, be treated with the respect and dignity that they deserved. Fundamental human rights were at the heart of their demands – the same rights that are the foundation of many of the social justice movements today: equal-pay-for-equal work, immigration rights, anti-human trafficking, and the “me too” movement.

Lupe Briseño, her companions and their role in the Kitayama Carnation strike empowered Latinas in the civil rights, labor, feminist, education, and social justice movements of the 1960s and 70s. Her actions and leadership are the shoulders upon which current Latina leaders stand.

Rosalind “Bee” Harris

Rosalind “Bee” Harris

Rosalind “Bee” Harris has dedicated her career to elevating communities of color by providing a
platform for their voices and their stories with the founding of the Denver Urban Spectrum newspaper
in 1987 and the Urban Spectrum Youth Foundation in 2000.

The Denver Urban Spectrum newspaper started as a way of “spreading the news about people of color” through informative, entertaining articles, and grew into a thirty-two-year-old institution that went beyond merely delivering information to showcase voices not heard in the mainstream media. In 2000 Harris founded the Urban Spectrum Youth Foundation, a mentoring program that trained youth from ages 11 to 17 in the field of journalism. During a seven-week summer program, participants learn skills and techniques in writing/reporting, photography, layout and design, sales and marketing, and business management. More than 250 youth have attended the award-winning program and produced multi-page publications distributed to all DUS readers after each session.

Harris has not only facilitated communication and advocated for people of color, but she has also been a cultural ambassador, historian, and advisor on local, national, and international levels. Harris has led the publication of stories of African American, Latino, Native American, and Asian women throughout the years. Her passion for and commitment to empowering women to reach new frontiers is seen in every issue of the newspaper and every event she supports. By dedicating her life’s work to the empowerment of others, Harris’ dedication to elevating the status of women is indispensable.

Velveta Howell

Velveta Howell

Velveta Howell has made many contributions as a life-long champion for social justice and advocacy. She is known as an exceptional role model for other African American women and girls. She was the eighth African American female graduate of the University of Colorado Law School and the first woman of color appointed as Colorado’s Deputy District Attorney. From her humble beginnings, she has worked tirelessly at the local, state, regional, and federal levels to advance the causes closest to her, succeeding in the fiercely competitive and often brutal world of criminal justice.

Through creative, solid, and sustainable policies, practices, and procedures, Howell designed roadmaps to enhance others’ lives, especially society’s most vulnerable. Her ability to visualize and eliminate impediments to social justice, equipped her to tear down barriers and increase access to social, civil, and criminal justice, quality and equal healthcare, clean water, affordable housing, food, and other critical services for people of all backgrounds.. Howell attributes her success to integrity, compassion
for all people, and an unrelenting commitment to justice. This determination has resulted in a succession of women, especially women of color, following her into this still male-dominated arena. Today, many African American prosecutors, judges, and defense attorneys in Colorado are inspired
and/or personally mentored by her.

Howell has worked to improve access to quality healthcare to all Colorado citizens, particularly under-served populations. She is one of twelve appointees to the Robert Wood Johnson-funded Colorado Healthcare Reform Executive Steering Committee and Turning Point Initiative . She is also the driver behind the committee’s focus on racial and ethnic healthcare disparities. This focus has resulted in the establishment and legislative enactment of the Colorado Office of Health Disparities , only the nation’s second.

Marianne Neifert, MD, MTS

Marianne Egeland Neifert

Colorado’s earliest physician breastfeeding champion, Marianne Egeland Neifert, MD, MTS, has devoted more than 40 years to improving maternal-child health. She provided education to diverse health professionals, implemented model lactation services, helped re-establish breastfeeding as a community norm, and advanced the nascent discipline of breastfeeding medicine.

Beginning in the late 1970s, Neifert was the first US physician to promote the routine use of modern lactation technologies in the management of breastfeeding difficulties. Neifert helped pioneer society-wide institutional support for breastfeeding mothers, and helped establish and advance the
new field of breastfeeding medicine. In 1984, she co-founded and served as the first Medical Director for the Denver Mothers’ Milk Bank (MMB). Today MMB is the largest non-profit human milk bank in North America, serving medically fragile newborns and infants. They have collected more than 5.5 million ounces of milk from more than 12,500 donors and dispensed screened-processed donor human milk to more than 120 hospitals in 35 states.

In 1990 Neifert co-founded the Colorado Breastfeeding Task Force, which later became the Colorado Breastfeeding Coalition. Their mission is to educate, advocate, and collaborate to reduce barriers and support all families to achieve their breastfeeding goals. In 1994, she co-founded the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, an international physician organization dedicated to the promotion, protection, and support of breastfeeding and the establishment of the field of breastfeeding medicine.

During her long career, Dr. Neifert has contributed to elevating breastfeeding from an individual mother’s “personal choice” to a public health priority warranting society-wide support. Her unwavering efforts to this end have made a significant impact on professional and lay breastfeeding education in Colorado and nationwide.

Gale Norton

Gale Norton

Gale Norton was the first woman Colorado Attorney General (1991-99) and the first woman to be appointed as Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior (2001-06). On behalf of Colorado and 45 other states as Colorado Attorney General, Norton helped negotiate the most extensive legal settlement in history: a $206 billion national tobacco settlement, the benefits of which continue to accrue. Gale is an exceptional role model for all women, but in particular those interested in pursuing careers in the law and public policy advocacy.

Norton pursued and won the suit against the Canadian mines speculator responsible for theenvironmental disaster at Summitville, caused by leakage of mining by-products into local waterways. She also won a significant court victory against the federal government, requiring the government to clean up hazardous waste at Rocky Flats and the Rocky Mountain Arsenal.

During her time as Secretary of the Interior, the US faced an energy crisis, and Norton introduced and diversified new domestic energy supplies. Among other initiatives, she worked closely with Congress to enact the Energy Policy Act of 2005, which set a 10-year goal for 10,000 megawatts of renewable energy from public sources. Norton also resolved a 70-year water dispute between Colorado and California, launched her water initiative to address western-water challenges and championed the creation of two crucial Colorado conservation areas: the Great Sand Dunes National Park and the Baca National Wildlife Refuge.

In 2011, she established the Norton Regulatory Strategies, where she provides policy advice to companies and organizations. She remains active representing the public interests in environmental policy and the protection of our natural resources, having chaired the National Park Foundation and the Migratory Bird Conservation Commission.

Historical

Mary Lou Anderson

Mary Lou Anderson

A passionate advocate for cultural arts and arts education, Mary Lou Anderson was an influential leader
in Colorado Springs, and across the state and the nation through her work in the development of programs that engage students, educators, and business leaders in the cultural arts. Anderson founded the National Parent Teacher Association Reflections Program and the Arts Business Education Consortium. For the last 50 years, the program has advanced the support and recognition of nearly 15 million students and educators for their artistic talents and achievements. More than 55% of the students recognized were girls. Anderson had a “big idea,” and she strategically created a framework that ensured the extension and legacy of that idea far beyond her initial efforts.

Anderson believed that recognition at an early age could help to combat gender discrimination by raising young girls’ awareness of and confidence in their artistic and leadership capabilities. These same experiences benefited all students, including boys and special needs students.

 

 

Dr. Alida Cornelia Avery

Dr. Alida Cornelia Avery

A graduate of the New England Female Medical College of Boston in 1862, Dr. Alida Cornelia Avery was a professor of Human Physiology and Hygiene, as well as a Resident Physician at the newly founded Vassar College from 1866-1874. In 1874 she moved to Denver, Colorado, and is credited with being Colorado’s first woman to practice medicine while also serving as the Superintendent of Hygiene for the State.

In 1876 she was elected the first president of the newly founded Colorado Woman Suffrage Association and was a dedicated and inspirational leader in the efforts to achieve the right to vote for Colorado women. Upon her death, her accomplishments in the Suffrage movement were still being recognized as a significant part of her legacy for the women in Colorado.

 

 

 

Elizabeth Piper Ensley

Elizabeth Piper Ensley

Elizabeth Piper Ensley was an African American educator, political activist, and suffragist. Her leadership was instrumental in Colorado’s victorious campaign for full voting rights in 1893. Ensley dedicated her career to organizing for women’s rights, especially for African American women. She led critical local, state, and national women’s organizations where she worked to bridge the racial lines in women’s organizations.

Ensley founded the Colorado Association of Colored Women’s Clubs in 1904 and served as an officer on the state Board of Directors of the Colorado State Federation of Women’s Clubs – the influential state organization primarily led by white women. Ensley was one of only a handful of African American women leaders nationwide who worked for suffrage rights within a racially integrated campaign organization, the Colorado Non-Partisan Equal Suffrage Association.

 

 

Carolina Gonzalez

Caroline Gonzalez

Carolina Acuña Díaz González was a Colorado Renaissance Pioneer, renowned for her welcoming home, her active support for the arts and culture, and her uniquely authentic restaurant, Casa Mayan, a “Mutalista” or refuge for 40 years for immigrants in Colorado. Carolina was an essential element in building and supporting the Denver community and ensuring that everyone felt a part of that community. She opened her doors to people of all nationalities and walks of life.

González provided accommodations and a safe haven during the Depression for countless youths, “riding the rails” to Colorado. In the 1950s, she opened “Carolina’s Casa” to anyone of any race fleeing persecution during the McCarthy era. She never turned anyone away, demonstrating the importance of community for all citizens, and the significant aspects of Mexican hospitality and generosity: “Mi Casa es Su Casa.” Her former residence is now part of the National Register of Historic Places and a Denver landmark.

 

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About the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame

Since 1985 the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame has inducted 162 women of various races, backgrounds, economic levels, career choices, political philosophies, and religious beliefs united by their outstanding contributions to society. The lives of these extraordinary women are shining examples of what can be achieved with passion, commitment, spirit, and the willingness to stand tall in the face of obstacles. They are trailblazers, visionaries, women of courage, glass-ceiling breakers, innovators, and rule changers in all walks of life. Their contributions span Colorado’s colorful and storied history, reach to its four corners, and have spread to touch our nation and our world.

They are teachers, doctors, scientists, politicians, social activists, bankers, newspaper publishers, philanthropists, humanitarians, authors, a symphony conductor, a former prime minister, a Nobel Peace Prize nominee, a jurist, a Pulitzer Prize winning playwright, an historical preservationist, a true Western pioneer, an aviation pioneer, a former Miss America, and a Cheyenne princess, to name a few. While some are well known throughout Colorado and the nation, others were pioneers in their small communities.

To learn more about inductees, visit: https://www.cogreatwomen.org/inductees/women-in-the-hall/

Stay in touch via Facebook: www.facebook.com/cogreatwomen,

LinkedIn Page

The LinkedIn group: Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame

Follow CWHF on Twitter @ColoradoWHF.

 

Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame Elects New Leadership

DENVER (Oct. 28, 2019) — The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame has named Deborah Radman to Chairman of the Board and Barbara Beckner as Vice Chair for 2019-2021. 

Radman has a long history of giving back to the community. Mentoring others is her passion and she focuses on teaching about the values so important to leading with integrity, intuition, and courage. For over 35 years she has worked “of counsel” to CEOs and senior management teams at small and large companies and major PR firms. Accredited by the Public Relations Society of America, is the Immediate Past Chair of its College of Fellows, having chaired the College in 2018. She is the recipient of 5 Silver Anvil awards from the PRSA, an industry equivalent to the movie industry Oscars. She also has served as chairman of the PRSA Counselors Academy and was president of both the New York and Colorado Chapters of PRSA. She is CEO of Radman Communications LLC and serves as an independent, senior public relations counselor affiliated with a number of different public relations firms throughout the country.  

“This is one of those board service opportunities that gives me more than I feel I give it,” says Radman. “The Hall is about inspiring all, especially women and girls, but men and boys as well. The magic of inspiration that our inductee stories trigger has the power to motivate those who experience it to Aspire Higher to their dreams – no matter who they are, their age, or station in life. That’s what being chairman of the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame gives to me.”

Beckner has served on the board since July 2018 focusing on events outreach and fundraising.  She has more than 30 years leading business growth and strategy in technology organizations, and she has a personal  goal to build high-performing teams that deliver on their overall goals. She brings that passion to her new role. 

 “The Hall is writing women back into history and this is what inspires me to honor and the amazing Colorado women that are often not recognized in media, by the business community and by educators,” says Beckner.  “We believe this needs to change, so we strive to celebrate, recognize, and educate Coloradans about the history, the accomplishments and the significance of Colorado women – past and present. In doing so, we extend the impact of their legacies.”

With the new roles for Radman and Beckner, Beth Barela becomes Immediate Past Chair and the director of the Advisory Board.

“It has been a privilege and a challenge to lead the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame for the last two years. It has been an exciting time for our Board who are dedicated to expanding the legacies of our Inductees, said Beth Barela outgoing board chair.  “As in all challenges, it has been a team effort. I am so grateful to be able to hand the reins to Deborah and Barb.”

The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame is currently looking forward to announcing its newest inductees and celebrating their lives at the Hall of Fame induction on March 18, 2020. 

About the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame

Since 1985 the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame has inducted 162 women of various races, backgrounds, economic levels, career choices, political philosophies, and religious beliefs united by their outstanding contributions to society. The lives of these extraordinary women are shining examples of what can be achieved with passion, commitment, spirit, and the willingness to stand tall in the face of obstacles. They are trailblazers, visionaries, women of courage, glass-ceiling breakers, innovators, and rule changers in all walks of life. Their contributions span Colorado’s colorful and storied history, reach its four corners, and have spread to touch our nation and our world.

 

They are teachers, doctors, scientists, politicians, social activists, bankers, newspaper publishers, philanthropists, humanitarians, authors, a symphony conductor, a former prime minister, a Nobel Peace Prize nominee, a jurist, a Pulitzer Prize winning playwright, an historic preservationist, a true Western pioneer, an aviation pioneer, a former Miss America, and a Cheyenne princess, to name a few. While some are well known throughout Colorado and the nation, others were pioneers in their small communities. To learn more about inductees, 
visit: https://www.cogreatwomen.org/inductees/women-in-the-hall/ 

 

Stay in touch via Facebook: www.facebook.com/cogreatwomen

 

The LinkedIn group: Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame

 

Follow CWHF on Twitter @ColoradoWHF. 

 

 

The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame is Accepting Nominations of Amazing Women

Deadline for entries is August 1, 2019

 

DENVER – February 28, 2019 – Do you know an amazing woman?  The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame (CWHF) begins its “Call for Nominations” for its next group of extraordinary women to be inducted into the Hall.  Representing the “Class of 2020,” up to ten women will be inducted in March 2020 during a special celebration in their honor.

Every two years, the CWHF inducts contemporary and historical women with significant ties to Colorado who have made enduring and exemplary contributions to their fields, elevated the status of women and helped open new frontiers for women and society.

“Women, and especially young girls, need role models who share a similar drive and vision in life, education, business, and personal development,” says Beth Barela, chair of CWHF.  “Too many of today’s girls and young women still struggle with low self esteem, the deeply rooted belief that they “can’t,” or that certain obstacles are insurmountable.  Having role models to study, emulate, and help them find ways to succeed is critical in women being able to create a healthy, happy, productive future for themselves.”

Nominations are generated by the citizens of Colorado who put forward a wide variety of extraordinary women for consideration.  These nominations are evaluated by an independent selection committee comprised of diverse citizens from around the state who are experts in their fields.  “We really hope for greater participation from Colorado citizens in submitting nominations this year for 2020,” says Barela.

The six contemporary and four historical women inducted into the Hall must meet the following criteria:

  • Made enduring contributions in their field
  • Elevated the status of women/girls
  • Helped open new frontiers for women and society

The Hall believes that individuals, businesses, and organizations that submit nominations for the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame send a strong message that women and their contributions matter.

Nominations are due by August 1, 2019. Tips and more information about the selection criteria as well as both English and Spanish version nomination forms are available to download at: https://www.cogreatwomen.org/inductees/nominate/

About the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame

Since 1985 the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame has inducted 162 women of various races, backgrounds, economic levels, career choices, political philosophies, and religious beliefs united by their outstanding contributions to society. The lives of these extraordinary women are shining examples of what can be achieved with passion, commitment, spirit, and the willingness to stand tall in the face of obstacles. They are trailblazers, visionaries, women of courage, glass-ceiling breakers, innovators, and rule changers in all walks of life. Their contributions span Colorado’s colorful and storied history, reach to its four corners, and have spread to touch our nation and our world.

They are teachers, doctors, scientists, politicians, social activists, bankers, newspaper publishers, philanthropists, humanitarians, authors, a symphony conductor, a former prime minister, a Nobel Peace Prize nominee, a jurist, a Pulitzer Prize winning playwright, an historical preservationist, a true Western pioneer, an aviation pioneer, a former Miss America, and a Cheyenne princess, to name a few. While some are well known throughout Colorado and the nation, others were pioneers in their small communities.

To learn more about inductees, visit: https://www.cogreatwomen.org/inductees/women-in-the-hall/

Stay in touch via Facebook: www.facebook.com/cogreatwomen,

The LinkedIn group: Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame

Follow CWHF on Twitter @ColoradoWHF.

 

Contact:             Deborah Radman | Deborah.radman@rad-comm.net

                             917-841-9228

Rocky Mountain PBS and the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame
Premieres Season 2 of Great Colorado Women
Historic, Multi-Episode Series Begins in Late-February

DENVER, Feb. 6, 2019 – The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame (CWHF) and Rocky Mountain PBS will debut Season Two of a broadcast series focusing on historic and contemporary Colorado women and their little-known, under-reported achievements. The five-episode series, Great Colorado Women, premiers on Thursday, February 28, 2019, and is produced by the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame (CWHF) Season Two is part of what is a multi-season series. These stories provide role models to remind women and girls; men and boys, so they can aspire higher to reach their dreams.

The Season Two premier airs statewide on Thursday, February 28 at 8:30pm MT on Rocky Mountain PBS.

The first episode features the story of Helen Bonfils: “Miss Helen: Bringing Culture to A Cow Town.” Bonfils was known affectionately as “Miss Helen” and also as “Poor Little Rich Girl.” She was one of Colorado’s most generous philanthropists and the leader of a cultural revolution.

The series resumes later in March as follows:
● Thursday 3/21 8:30-9:00pm Arlene Hirschfeld: “Denver’s Spirit of Volunteerism”
● Thursday 3/28 8:30-9:00pm Gudy Gaskill: “Blazing the Colorado Trail”
● Thursday 4/4 8:30-9:00pm Doreen Pollack: “Giving Silence a Voice”
● Thursday 4/11 8:30-9:00pm Mildred “Babe” Zaharias: “The Greatest Athlete”

“So many women in the Hall are unsung heroes, hidden figures who have endured with superlative strength, beauty and love. They deserve absolute respect and acknowledgment,” says Betty Heid, CWHF’s executive producer of the series. “They are shining examples of the potential of all women. Their accomplishments are worthy of being emulated and have shaped history and transformed lives.” Each episode of Great Colorado Women meets Colorado Academic Standards for K-12 and can easily be integrated into classroom studies through PBS LearningMedia that schools can consider using in their curricula to teach students about women’s history.

Julie Speer Jackson, Vice President of Culture Content at Rocky Mountain PBS says, “This series, in its second year airing on Rocky Mountain PBS, is really an eye-opener to the impact women have had on our state, our country, and our world. We think it will have broad audience appeal for Colorado citizens including the general public, historians, elementary through high school students, and college students. We want to help others to know about those who have gone before us, and in doing so, we believe the
stories about the women in the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame will inspire women to play a bigger role in shaping Colorado’s history,” she added.
History has shown that when women get involved, great things can happen. “A better world happens when women’s contributions are encouraged and recognized,” Heid emphasizes. “Women have been overlooked in history and in the media. The amazing stories of women’s success, leadership, vision, and accomplishments have not been told.”
Great Colorado Women draws on the historic, scientific, cultural, public policy, education, agriculture, healthcare, and social justice accomplishments of the current 162 women in the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame.

Enchanted Road Productions, along with Heid, produces these programs that will sustain the series for multiple seasons. Rocky Mountain PBS is actively seeking underwriting to support this programming. CWHF is working on community and corporate sponsorships to support production. Both the CWHF and RMPBS believe that individuals, businesses, and organizations can garner great benefit from sponsoring and sending a strong message that women and their contributions matter. A special invitation-only preview screening event will be held in late February, hosted and sponsored by Balfour Senior Living at its Riverfront Park location in lower downtown Denver. Balfour communities are
highly regarded for their comfortable elegance and for the individualized quality of life. But it’s their dedication to service, innovation, and respect that truly define The Balfour Way.

Girl Scouts of Colorado and Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame
Launch Colorado Women’s History Patch Program
DENVER, CO Jan. 28 – Girl Scouts of Colorado (GSCO) and the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame (CWHF) have joined forces to create a patch for Girl Scouts of all ages. The history of women isn’t taught in Colorado schools. Since the Girl Scouts provide opportunities for girls to learn by exploring their interests, passions and dreams, the exposure to great Colorado women – both historic and contemporary — provides role models to begin to fill that gap. “As Girl Scouts, girls prepare for a lifetime of leadership, success, and adventure in a safe, no-limits place designed for and by girls,” says Stephanie Foote, President and CEO of GSCO, “The idea is to learn by doing and be inspired to discover her talents and passions in a safe and supportive allgirl setting. Along with other Girl Scouts and people in her community, our girls have the potential to change the world.”
CWHF highlights extraordinary women, their accomplishments and impact on Colorado, the United States and even the world. Hall inductees are women who, through grit and grace, have advanced the roles of today’s women to levels of heightened recognition and models of inspiration. “Who better than CWHF to provide an adventure in learning about contemporary and historic Colorado women,” asks Beth Barela, CWHF board chair. “The mission synergy between our two organizations is uncanny. The Colorado women in the Hall are leaders, trail blazers, pioneers and even unsung heroes who have endured challenges, discrimination, hardship, loss, but also great successes. They are shining examples of the potential of all women.” CWHF and GSCO believe that bringing these inspirational stories to Girl Scouts through a fun, engaging and challenging activity like earning this patch, will begin to help girls to know about those who have gone before them, and in doing so, inspire these young women and girls to play a bigger
role in shaping the future. To earn the CWHF patch, Girl Scouts can complete at least three of the following seven activities within a 12-month period.

After earning the patch, the Girl Scout/Girl Scout troop is invited to share their experiences on the Girl Scouts of Colorado blog!
“Considering that 2019 is the 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote, a critical milestone in the women’s equal rights movement, still today,” says Barela. “Throughout Colorado this year there will be ample discussion, publicity, exhibits and events celebrating 100 years of women’s suffrage. What a perfect year to launch this partnership with the Girl Scouts.” “We are the preeminent leadership development organization for girls,” says Foote. “Girl Scouts builds girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place.” About Girl Scouts of Colorado
Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. Girl Scouts offers every girl a chance to practice a lifetime of leadership, adventure, and success. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org

About the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame:
The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame was created to recognize, honor and preserve the
contributions of trailblazing Colorado women. Both historical and contemporary women have shared foresight, vision and accomplishment, but lacked a forum for recognition. Since 1985, the Hall has inducted 152 extraordinary women who have been outstanding in their field, elevated the status of women, helped open new frontiers for women or inspired others by their example. Inductees include scientists, teachers, social activists, philanthropists, authors, business leaders, elected officials and more.

To learn more about inductees, visit: Women of the Hall

Stay in touch via Facebook on Twitter @ColoradoWHF.

The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame and Women of Denver Join Forces

National Mentoring Month Event Kicks Off New Partnership

 DENVER, CO   Jan. 10– The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame (CWHF) and the Women of Denver (WOD) network have entered into a partnership to broaden the reach of both organizations in educating and inspiring Colorado women of all ages.  The partnership will support brand awareness building and community outreach for both.

“One of the challenges CWHF has as an established organization with a solid following of both men and women, is the need to diversify our reach to include and engage younger generations,” says Beth Barela, CWHF board chair.  “Women of Denver is one of the most diverse, active and progressive organizations in Denver with a solid following of next generation women bringing fresh perspectives about the roles and impact of Colorado women making a difference.”

To kick off the partnership, CWHF and WOD, along with the Colorado Center for Women’s History, are hosting an evening with a multigenerational panel of CWHF inductees and WOD founder Krystal Covington as panel moderator.  The event, “Mentors & Role Models: Diverse Pathways to Success,” focuses on the importance of both mentors and role models along the career-life continuum and celebrates January as National Mentoring Month.

The event will be held on Thursday, January 31st from 6:00-8:30pm at Women in Kind, located at 3899 Jackson St, Denver, CO 80205.  Doors will open at 6pm; the program begins at 6:30pm.  Register for tickets at www.cogreatwomen.org. Seating is limited.

 

I’m excited to moderate this special kickoff panel event and showcase some of Denver’s most well-known mentors,” says WOD’s Covington. “Mentors are an important part of the journey to success in both career and life, and the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame is a premier resource for modeling mentorship by elevating women who make an impact. I’m thrilled to partner with an organization that supports the elevation of women and eager to put our ideas into action.”

 

Panelists include:

 

  • Krystal Covington, panel moderator, founded Women of Denver in 2014 to connect and inspire 100,000 women through educational events and dynamic thought leadership, so they can acquire knowledge and confidence to earn their worth.

 

  • Juana Bordas is president of Lideramos,The National Latino Leadership Alliance, working in developing leadership programs across the country, helping women and people of color empower themselves and their communities. She is the author of two books on diverse leadership which have both been acknowledged for their excellence:   “The Power of Latino Leadership” and “Salsa, Soul, and Spirit: Leadership for a Multicultural Age.” Bordas was inducted into CWHF in 1997.

 

  • Gerie Grimes, CEO and president of the Hope Center and community advocate for quality education for children in their early years regardless of level of capability, race, or how society has labeled them. Grimes was inducted into CWHF in 2018.

 

  • Ding-Wen Hsu is a business executive and community leader with a tireless commitment to presenting Asian culture and highlighting the deep traditions of Colorado’s Asian population. She was inducted in 2010.

 

  • Gail Schoettler was the first woman to be both Colorado’s Lt. Governor (elected in 1994) and State Treasurer (from 1987 to 1994). She ran for governor in 1998 and lost by 5000 votes, leading her to found Women Electing Women, a national alliance of women who financially support women running for Governor and U.S. Senate. Also she was appointed by President Clinton as U.S. ambassador to negotiate a global treaty with 189 nations on the use of radio spectrum for all commercial, civil and military purposes. Schoettler was inducted in 2018.

 

Key takeaways:

  • Understand the meaning and purpose of mentoring and how being a mentor differs from being a role model.
  • Discover the economic and inspirational power of mentorship.
  • Learn how to build and maintain effective mentor relationships.

 

This event is Ideal for:

  • Experienced leaders with the desire to “give back,” by becoming a mentor.
  • Young professionals who want to create mentor relationships with leaders they admire.
  • Experienced “mentees,” who love to share their experiences with building and maintaining great relationships that lead to valuable results.

 

About the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame:

The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame was created to recognize, honor and preserve the contributions of trailblazing Colorado women. Both historical and contemporary women have shared foresight, vision and accomplishment, but lacked a forum for recognition. Since 1985, the Hall has inducted 152 extraordinary women who have been outstanding in their field, elevated the status of women, helped open new frontiers for women or inspired others by their example. Inductees include scientists, teachers, social activists, philanthropists, authors, business leaders, elected officials and more.

 

To learn more about inductees, 
visit: https://www.cogreatwomen.org/inductees/women-in-the-hall/

Stay in touch via Facebook: www.facebook.com/cogreatwomen, the LinkedIn group: Colorado

Follow CWHF on Twitter @ColoradoWHF.

 

About Women of Denver: 

Women of Denver (WOD) is the most diverse and active women’s organization in Denver. With over 40 events per year their dynamic network helps women increase their business acumen, sharpen leadership skills and connect with other high-achieving women. WOD’s mission is to connect and inspire 100,000 women through their educational events and progressive thought-leadership, so they can acquire the knowledge and confidence to earn their worth.  Learn more at www.thewomenofdenver.com

 



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