Jean Jones

As President and CEO of Girl Scouts – Mile Hi Council since 1982, Jean Jones has made significant and enduring contributions to the lives of Colorado’s girls by creating an innovative and contemporary environment in which today’s girls are cultivated to become tomorrow’s leaders. Under Jones’ direction, Mile Hi Council is the 13th largest of more than 300 councils in the United States. Jones has played a key role in increasing membership numbers, reaching out to all girls regardless of racial, cultural, or socioeconomic boundaries. In an effort to keep Girl Scouting contemporary, Jones promotes a program that includes traditional activities like camping, selling cookies, and community service and adds innovative activities like developing web sites, creating a robot, and learning how to make an electrical circuit. Mile Hi Council has also become a national model for programs serving low-income and minority girls.

Program emphases that Jones promotes at the Mile Hi Council include healthy living, the arts, science, technology, engineering, and math. Jones is a fitness enthusiast herself and believes that a positive body image and healthy habits learned in childhood will carry a woman through to healthier adulthood. She created the Women of Distinction program to bring together Girl Scouts and women who are corporate and community leaders to serve as role models for girls.

In true Girl Scout form, one of Jones’ driving passions in life is to serve her community. Jones was elected the first woman president of the Rotary Club in 1995 and now serves as a trustee of the Rotary Club Foundation. One of her most fulfilling endeavors was serving on the Colorado Civil Rights Commission, striving for equal rights for all Colorado citizens. Jones is also a member and a past president of the Women’s Forum of Colorado and serves as trustee and past chair for the Colorado Trust. She has been vice chair and trustee of Historic Denver and member and past president of the Minoru Yasui Community Volunteer Award Committee. Currently, Jones is a board member of the Samaritan Institute and the Mountain States Employers Council.

Jones was born and raised in Denver, Colorado, a fifth-generation Coloradoan whose grandmother’s grandfather, James Correy, came to Colorado with General Palmer as the lobbyist for the Denver and Rio Grande Railroads. Jones and her husband of 42 years have two sons and four grandchildren, one of whom is already a Girl Scout.