Pauline Short Robinson

Pauline Robinson was a trailblazer who opened many doors for women and girls. An Emily Griffith Opportunity School graduate, she earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver and did extensive graduate work. Determined and persevering, she became the first African-American librarian in Denver in 1943. Because the library system had so few books for African-American children, she sold 150 home-baked pies and cakes to earn the money to buy a core collection. After working in several branches, she spent for 15 years as coordinator of Children’s Services. Robinson established one of the largest summer reading programs in the country, introduced Reading Is Fundamental to Denver, and served on the selection committees for the nation’s two most prestigious children’s book awards. A community leader, she organized the first Negro History Week at New Hope Baptist Church, which evolved into Denver’s Black History Month. The Pauline Robinson Library at Thirty-third and Holly Streets is named in her honor.